Ida Johnson Craven

November 3, 2013 

Ida Johnson Craven

Ida Johnson Craven, 82, of Raleigh, died Friday, October 25, 2013 at Rex Healthcare in Raleigh.

Ida was born December 8, 1930 to the late Joseph Nathan Johnson and Ida Lee Johnson. She was a beloved mother, grandmother, and friend. Know. To her family and many friends as "MaMa," She was a member of Ephesus Baptist Church, enjoyed quilting and was the greatest cook ever.

Ida was preceded in death by her husband of 47 years, Marvin Craven; and daughter, Judy Craven.

She is survived by her son, Wesley Eugene Craven and his wife, Cindy of Greensboro, NC; daughters, Deborah Morgan of Wesley Chapel, FL; Shelley Jones and her husband, Jeff of Silk Hope, NC; and Renatta Craven of Chapel Hill, NC; brother, Charlie Johnson of Smithfield, NC; sisters, Elizabeth Newsome and her husband, Albert of Smithfield, NC; and Lillie Mae Cooper of Garner, NC; four grandchildren, Jenna Serrano and her husband, Hugo; Erika Trevathen and her husband, Michael; and Jessica and Garrett Jones; and five great grandchildren, Sebastian Serrano; Brianna Serrano; Hailey Trevathen; Mary Kathryn Trevathen; and Isabella Trevathen.

A funeral service will be held 2 pm Monday, October 28, 2013 at Ephesus Baptist Church, 6767 Hillsborough Street, Raleigh, NC 27606. Burial will follow the service at Montlawn Memorial Park, 2911 S. Wilmington St, Raleigh, NC 27603. The family will receive friends 1-2 pm prior to the service at the church.

Memorials may be made to Ephesus Baptist Church.

Condolences may be sent to www.BrownWynneCary.com

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