High school sports athletes are at an all-time high

From NCHSAA Press ReleasesNovember 8, 2013 

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Female participation in high school athletics registered its 24th straight increase, topping the 3.2 million mark for the 2012-13 school year.

PHOTO BY THOMAS BABB — 2009 NEWS & OBSERVER FILE PHOTO

Participation in high school sports increased for the 24th consecutive year in 2012-13 and passed the 7.7 million mark for the first time, according to the annual High School Athletics Participation Survey conducted by the National Federation of State High School Associations.

Based on figures from the 51 NFHS-member state high school associations, which includes the District of Columbia, sports participation for the 2012-13 school year reached an all-time high of 7,713,577 participants – an increase of 21,057.

An additional 15,190 girls participated in high school sports last year, moving the girls alltime record to 3,222,723 and marking the 24th consecutive year for an increase in the number of female participants. After its first decrease in 20 years last year, boys’ participation started on the upswing again with an additional 5,867 participants. The boys’ total of 4,490,854 is second all-time to the 4,494,406 in 2010-11.

“While we recognize that many schools are experiencing challenges with funding high school sports programs,” said Bob Garner, NFHS executive director, “we are encouraged that schools are responding to the challenges and that more and more students are involved ….”

Eight of the top 10 girls’ sports registered increases in participation in 2012-13, led by competitive spirit squads (8,201), outdoor track and field (4,172), and swimming and diving (3,536). Lacrosse, cross country, volleyball, soccer and tennis also had additional female participants, while basketball and fast-pitch softball had minor declines.

Five of the top 10 boys’ sports showed increases in participation, led by outdoor track and field (5,044), swimming and diving (4,354), and basketball (3,387). Cross country and baseball also registered gains among top 10 sports.

Eleven-player football remains the top sport for boys, with 1,086,627 participants in 2012-13, although the number of players has decreased slightly each of the past four years, including a drop of 9,366 from 2011-12 to 2012-13.

In terms of combined participation, track and field, and swimming and diving registered the best overall gains. Track and field had an increase of more than 9,100 participants when combining girls and boys, while swimming and diving was up almost 8,000 participants.

Girls’ sports outside the top 10 that recorded increases in participants and could be emerging sports for females are bowling (25,450 participants in 2012-13), ice hockey (9,447), wrestling (8,727) and flag football (7,019).

A sizeable increase in “adapted sports” participation also contributed to the rise in 2012-13 figures. With seven states offering these programs for students with disabilities in 14 sports, the number of participants rose almost 3,000 to 8,747 (girls and boys combined).

The top 10 states by participants remained in the same order as last year, with Texas and California topping the list with 798,333 and 777,545, respectively. The remainder of the top 10 was New York (389,475), Illinois (339,944), Ohio (327,919), Pennsylvania (315,492), Michigan (304,438), New Jersey (270,423), Florida (243,397) and Minnesota (230,421). Although only one of the top 10 states registered an increase in participation (New Jersey), overall, 30 states reported higher figures from the previous year.

The participation survey has been compiled since 1971 by the NFHS through numbers it receives from its member associations.

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